Mechanism of Action

BAXDELA® (delafloxacin) Mechanism of Action

MOLECULAR ENGINEERING HAS LED TO THE CREATION OF BAXDELA

  • Anionic in nature
  • Antibacterial activity is due to the inhibition of topoisomerase IV and DNA gyrase
    • Similar affinity for both enzymes1,2
  • Complex pathway required for resistance
    • In vitro resistance to BAXDELA developed by multiple step mutations in the quinolone-resistance determining regions of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. BAXDELA-resistant mutants were selected in vitro at a frequency of <10-9
  • Cross-resistance between BAXDELA and other fluoroquinolones has been observed. However, some isolates resistant to other fluoroquinolones may be susceptible to BAXDELA

1. Van Bambeke F. Delafloxacin, a non-zwitterionic fluoroquinolone in Phase III of clinical development: evaluation of its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and clinical efficacy. Future Microbiol. 2015;10(7):1111-1123. doi:10.2217/fmb.15.39
2. Jorgensen SCJ, Mercuro NJ, Davis SL, Rybak MJ. Delafloxacin: place in therapy and review of microbiologic, clinical and pharmacologic properties. Infect Dis Ther. 2018;7(2):197-217. doi:10.1007/s40121‑018‑0198‑x

BAXDELA® is indicated in adults for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) caused by designated susceptible bacteria.